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National Treasures – Conference & AGM 2018

 

The Conference and AGM was held at the Cedar Court Hotel, Denby Dale Road, Calder Grove,Wakefield, WF4 3QZ from Friday 23 March to Sunday 25 March 2018.

Main Programme #Guildconf2018

Photo Gallery

Friday 23rd March 2018

14:00 onwards
(Foyer)
Registration
For those who are interested a chance to visit West Yorkshire History Centre.
15:00 – 16:00
(Hawthorne Suite)
Introduction to The Members’ Websites WIKI
Jim Benedict( 4789) – TNG team leader
16:00 – 17:00
(Hawthorne Suite)
Mining Disasters: Rescue and Recovery
Anne Bradley – National Coal Mining Museum
17:00 – 18:00
(Pine Room)
General Help Clinic
An opportunity to have an informal face to face discussion with fellow Guild members about anything associated with One-Name Studies.

18:00
(Cedar Suite)

Buffet
19:30
(Cedar Suite)
Quiz

Saturday 24th March 2018

07:30 – 10:30
(Restaurant 85)
Breakfast
09:00
(Cedar Suite)

Annual General Meeting

10:30 – 11:00
(Cedar Suite)

Morning Coffee

11:00 – 12:00
(Cedar Suite)
The West Riding Registry of Deeds
David Morris – Archivist, West Yorkshire History Centre
12:00 – 13:30
(Restaurant 85)
Lunch
Committee Meeting (Pine Room)
13:30 – 14:30
(Cedar Suite)
Divine Inspiration: Family History and Archbishops’ Registers
Gary Brannan – Access Archivist, Borthwick Institute for Archives
14:30 – 15:30
(Cedar Suite)
Driver, Draughtman, Cleaner, Clerk: Discovering your railway family at the National Railway Museum
Peter Thorpe and Angélique Bonamy
15:30 – 16:00
(Cedar Suite)
 Afternoon Tea
16:00 – 17:00
(Cedar Suite)
Researching Family & Local History using the Daily Herald Archive
Kirsty Fife – Curator of Library and Archives, National Science and Media Museum
17:00 – 17-30
(Oak/Hawthorne Suite)
Post Holders meeting with Paul Howes
19:00
(Cedar Suite)
Reception
19:30
(Cedar Suite)
Conference Dinner
After dinner speaker Guild Patron Peter O’Donoghue

Sunday 25th March 2018

07:45 – 09:30
(Restaurant 85)
Breakfast
08:45 – 09:15
(Oceans Suite)
Ecumenical Service
09:30 – 10:30
(Cedar Suite)
Eating the Elephant – Records Management and Service Personnel Records in the UK Ministry of Defence – Paul Stevenson
10:30 – 11:00
(Cedar Suite)
Morning Coffee
11:00 – 12:00
(Cedar Suite)
Searching The Gazette
Brian Bush, Business Development Manager
12:00 – 13:30
(Restaurant 85)
Lunch
Regional Reps Meeeting (Oceans Suite)
13:30 – 14:30
(Cedar Suite)
The National Fairground and Circus Archive
Angela Haighton – Head of National Fairground and Circus Archive & Digital Humanities, Sheffield University Library
14:30 – 15:00
(Cedar Suite)
 Afternoon Tea 
15:00 – 16:00
(Cedar Suite)
The British Library at Boston Spa – A National Resource
Ben Sanderson, Head of Press and Communications, The British Library

16:00 – 16:30
(Cedar Suite)

Conference Close

Photo Gallery


Introduction to The Members’ Websites WIKI by Jim Benedict( 4789) – TNG team leader

Jim has been a member of the Alberta Family Histories Society (AFHS) in Calgary for 15 years, is Chairman of the society’s Genealogy Computing Group and is also on the AFHS board. He is also a member of the Guild of One-Name Studies since 2007 and is the Guild’s West Canada regional representative. Since 2014, he has been one of the team leaders for the Guild’s Members’ Websites Project.

Profile: Jim Benedict was born in 1944 and raised in Calgary, Alberta where he and Joan have a son and two grandchildren. As an electrical engineer, his career kept Jim busy on major projects and travel, and then in building a software service company over the past 30 years. But then he inherited the trunk full of family photos and the dog-eared family history book, thinking this should only take a weekend of computer entry to document everything. Ten years later, he is still researching the Benedict tree.

This presentation was recorded.

 


Mining Disasters: Rescue and Recovery by Anne Bradley – National Coal Mining Museum

The National Coal Mining Museum for England is based at Caphouse Colliery, Overton near Wakefield. The museum aims to keep coal mining alive by collecting and preserving the industry’s rich heritage, creating enjoyable and inspiring ways to learn for people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities. It covers an extensive 45 acre site including the museum and archives as well as
the underground mine, open to visitors for underground tours, and associated buildings and equipment. The extensive library and archive contains issues of Coal News and details of
collieries throughout England. The library can help researchers find their coal mining ancestors although it doesn’t hold employment records.

Profile: Anne Bradley is Curator of Social & Oral History at the National Coal Mining Museum.

This presentation was not recorded.

 


2018 Annual General Meeting (AGM) by Chairman Paul Howes

Hello everyone. On behalf of the Guild committee it is my absolute pleasure to welcome you to this our 39th Conference and Annual General Meeting. I think this will be my eighth conference, having missed only one since I first met other Guild members in Daresbury, near Warrington, in 2011. For me, it was a seminal moment. I had such a great time and stayed in the bar till quite late chatting with many other members, whose names will remain unstated, but I suspect Dave, Bob and Debbie will remember! Ok, it wasn’t “late” but “early” if you get my drift!

On behalf of the committee too, I want to thank our organizers, Jackie Depelle, David Burgess and Paul Featherstone who have worked tirelessly over the past few months to line up an excellent range of speakers for us. Even though we change organizers frequently we do try to transfer learning from one year to the next. So if something went well for you or something didn’t go so well, please do tell them directly or make a note to mention it on the feedback form. Thank you in advance for your comments. When I heard that three of our members from Yorkshire were working to the theme of National Treasures, I thought, “Eh, up,” and wondered whether we were going to hear from the likes of Sir Geoffrey Boycott, Harvey Smith, David
Hockney, Alan Bennett, Jess’ Ennis, Kevin Keegan or even Nora Batty.

Probably too expensive to get any of them, let alone all of them. I can hear the organizers astoundedly responding, “Ow mooch?” in response to agents’ demands for appearance money.
So would we instead be subjected to lectures on making Yorkshire puddings through the ages, or breeding whippets, or Wensleydale cheese, or Sheffield steel or why Harry Ramsden’s deserves a Michelin star? Other possibilities of cheap presentations flashed before me like learning Yorkshire accents so we could do One-Name Stoodies, being able to chant “On Ilkley Moor bar t’at” – I had to remind myself in advance that chant rhymes with rant – or even the local amateur dramatic club’s rendering of Wuthering Heights.

Despite all those fears of this southern pansy, when I saw the actual schedule, I was really delighted. The organizers have done a super job with so many national institutions with a local presence or even headquarters. I am simply amazed at the range of topics and the obvious expertise of the speakers. So I am looking forward to learning how I can use what they have to improve my own ONS now I will have so much extra time on my hands . . .

Yes, this is my last conference as chairman. I’d like to thank everyone with whom I have interacted and worked with over the past three years. It has been a pleasure. Thank you for your support, which I hope you will extend to my successor. See you next year, I hope.

So, welcome, and whether you are a late bird or an early bird, do take full advantage of the opportunity to interact with the other delegates. You will make long-lasting friends, I guarantee it.

Paul Howes, Chairman

The AGM was recorded.

 

 


The West Riding Registry of Deeds by David Morris – Archivist, West Yorkshire History Centre

The focus of the talk will be the historic deeds registry situated in Wakefield. Comprising over 12,000 bound volumes this name rich resource dates back to 1704 and includes details of land transactions all the way through to 1970. This talk will look at what led the registry to be set up, the type of information it contains and some of the treasures within it.

Profile: David Morris has been Archivist at the Wakefield branch of the West Yorkshire Archive Service for the last 6 years. David initially started out life at Wakefield as an archive assistant before travelling up to the University of Glasgow to undertake his Master’s degree in Archive and Record Keeping. Returning to Wakefield a year later as Archivist, David oversaw the move
from the historic Registry of Deeds building to the new purpose built West Yorkshire History Centre.

This presentation was recorded.

 


Divine Inspiration: Family History and Archbishops’ Registers by Gary Brannan – Access Archivist, Borthwick Institute for Archives

Taking the Registers of the Archbishops of York as a case study, this talk will examine the many hidden stories which could transform a family history dating back to the 17th century. From wayward abbots and disobedient clergy, to personal expressions of piety and faith, the registers document not only the ‘big’ national narratives of history, but also contain evidence of many smaller, everyday stories. From the aftermath of Magna Carta to the fires of civil war, this talk looks at some of stories hidden (and waiting to be discovered) in these unique records.

Profile: Gary Brannan is Access Archivist at the Borthwick Institute for Archives with special responsibility for the medieval collections there. Gary worked on the ‘York’s Archbishops Registers Revealed’ project, and has research interests in the clergy and the Black Death in Yorkshire.

This presentation was recorded.

 


Driver, Draughtman, Cleaner, Clerk: Discovering your railway family at the National Railway Museum by Peter Thorpe and Angélique Bonamy

The National Railway Museum (NRM) is well known for its large technical archive and library of engineering drawings and timetables, but dig a bit deeper and you will find personal details of thousands of railway workers who made the railways happen. This talk will describe how NRM resources can help you discover your railway family and learn more about their lives. It will
describe some of the key personal archive collections and will feature newly discovered film footage as well as highlights from the vast oral history collection.

Angélique’s Profile: Associate Archivist – Film and Sound. Angélique joined the NRM in July 2015 to survey the film and sound collection and enable its access and use. She previously studied and worked at the French Film Archives. She is especially interested in amateur films and individual histories and is working with families to help preserve their railway film collections at
the NRM.

Peter’s Profile: Library Services Supervisor. Peter has worked for over 10 years helping researchers in Search Engine, the NRM’s library and archive centre. Many visitors to the museum are interested in the background of their railway worker ancestors, so he has plenty of experience helping people with family history research. He currently manages the Search Engine public service as well as being responsible for the museum’s library collections.

Handout: http://www.nrm.org.uk/researchandarchive

This presentation was recorded.

 


Researching Family & Local History using the Daily Herald Archive by Kirsty Fife – Curator of Library and Archives, National Science and Media Museum

In this presentation I will introduce the sources available for research at the National Science and Media Museum, focusing on materials of particular relevance to family and local history researchers, including the Daily Herald Archive.

Profile: Kirsty Fife is Curator of Library and Archives at the National Science and Media Museum. Her role involves overseeing management of library and archive collections, collections access and research support in the museum’s Collections and Research Centre, Insight. Her previous posts have included roles at the Parliamentary Archives and Hoxton Hall in London.

This presentation was recorded.

 


Eating the Elephant – Records Management and Service Personnel Records in the UK Ministry of Defence – Paul Stevenson

The UK MOD holds 20 million files in its archives. Around 12 million of these relate to service personnel from the period 1890 – 1960. This talk will give an insight into the records themselves, the issues surrounding their transfer to The National Archives and latest developments.

Profile: Paul Stevenson studied History and Politics at Stirling University before joining the Ministry of Defence in 1990. Following appointments in equipment procurement and support as a finance specialist and shared services design and delivery, he became a records manager in 2008. He currently works in Defence Business Services as Head of the MOD Record Office, with responsibility for the management of the MOD’s archives and the review and disposal of MOD records. Between 2015 and 2017 he led an MOD study to recommend how service personnel records selected for permanent preservation could be made available to the public.

This presentation was not recorded.

 


Searching The Gazette by Brian Bush, Business Development Manager

The London Gazette has been recording events both at home and abroad for over 350 years, and is a key resource for researchers and historians. This talk is designed to help you get the most out of your search and will outline the many different types of information that has been, and still is, in many instances, published in The Gazette. The Gazette is fully digitised and is available to search for free online at www.thegazette.co.uk.

Profile: Brian is Business Development Manager at Williams Lea Tag (WLT) and manages this area of The Gazette on behalf of The National Archives. Brian joined WLT in 2017, having run his own consultancy business for many years, helping organisations within the public, private and not-for-profit sectors. Brian is responsible for creating new products and services for The
Gazette to help ensure its longevity.

This presentation was recorded.

 


The National Fairground and Circus Archive by Angela Haighton – Head of National Fairground and Circus Archive & Digital Humanities, Sheffield University Library

An introduction to the National Fairground and Circus Archive, covering its history, the collections they hold and their conservation and outreach activities.

Profile: Angela Haighton is the Head of the National Fairground and Circus Archive & Digital Humanities at the University of Sheffield Library. She completed the Master of Archives and Records Management programme at the University of Liverpool in 2008. Since then she has travelled the UK, working in archives in Oxford, Suffolk, Bristol and the Scottish Borders with
collections ranging from the archive of the renowned rugby commentator, Bill McLaren, to the archives of the Rhodesian Army. Angela held the post of Public Records Officer, Isle of Man, before coming to Sheffield.

This presentation was recorded but only the audio can be made available to the public.

 


The British Library at Boston Spa – A National Resource by Ben Sanderson, Head of Press and Communications, The British Library

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest research libraries. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection. The Library’s collection has developed over 250 years and exceeds 150 million separate items representing every age of written civilisation. It includes books, journals, manuscripts, maps, stamps, music, patents, newspapers and sound recordings in all written and spoken languages. You can consult millions of items including books, periodicals, newspapers, microfilm, sound recordings and electronic resources in the British Library’s Reading Room at Boston Spa, near Wetherby in Yorkshire. Around 85% of the items requested at St Pancras are now also available to readers at Boston Spa.

Profile: Ben Sanderson is the British Library’s Head of Press and Communications. He has worked at the library since 2001 and manages the press office and internal communications team at the library’s sites in London and Yorkshire.

This presentation was recorded.

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