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3179

Kipp

 

About the study

The first goal is to discover the number of founding families with the Kip/Kipp surname. This rather unusual surname is found in low numbers throughout the world. All Kip/Kipp families are welcome to participate.

A second goal is to bring together descendants of Hendrick Hendricksen Kip (cir 1600 - Sept. 14, 1685), who came to New Amsterdam between 1637 and 1643. For many of the Kip/Kipp descendants of Hendrick linking back to the original 1630s ancestor may be achieved by finding common ancestry through DNA testing. Descendants of daughters of this Kip/Kipp family are welcomed to join as well.

Variant names

Kip, Kipp
Kyp, de Kype

Transcription variants or errors: Hip, Hipp, Hepp, Rip, Rap, Rep, Rop, Ripp, Kep, Kop, Kap, Kiss, Kiff, Kipf, Kipo, Ripp, Kepf, Kepp and Friss

Name origin

German: topographic name for someone living on a hill.

Scotland: locational name from a minor place called Kype in the parish of Avondale, Lanarkshire, believed to be so named from the Gaelic 'kip, ceap', tree-stock, stump (mediaeval Scottish origin).

History of the name

Information on the Ancestry of Hendrick Hendricksen (Kip) the Founder of the Kip/Kipp Family in America.

Hendrick Hendricksen (Kip) was born about 1600 in Niewenhuys (Niewenhuis) as recorded in the Book of Betrothals in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Series of Baptism -€“ Marriage and Burial Registers in Amsterdam No. 629-fo. 43.V.. On April 20, 1624, Heyndrik Heyndrixsz of Niewenhuys, 24 years of age, was betrothed to Tryntie Lubberts from Swoll (Zwoll), 25 years of age, orphan. Tyrntie was born about 1599. History of the Kip Family in America, by Frederic Ellsworth Kipp, 1928.

This is what the record says:

20 April 1624 Heyndrick Heyndrixsz,
van Niewenhuys, snyder, out 24 jaren,
geasst~ met zyn swager Blomert Sanders, 9 ans woon~ inde Servetsteeg
& Tryntie Lubberts, van Swoll, out 25 jaren, geen
ouders hebbend, a puero woon~ inde Angelierstraet, geass~
met haer nigte Annetie Heyndrix

signed Hendrick Hendricxsen, Trineke Loebes
TB 429p86 - Huwelijksintekeningen in de kerk

Translation:

20 April 1624 Heyndrick Heyndricksz,
from Niewenhuys, tailor, 24 years old,
assisted by his brother-in-law Blomert Sanders, since 9 years living in the Servetsteeg,
was betrothed to Tryntie Lubberts, from Zwolle, 25 years old, parents
dead, since childhood living in the Anjeliersstraat, assisted
by her cousin Annetie Heyndrix

signed Hendrick Hendricxsen, Trineke Loebes
DTB 429p86 -€“ Marriage intentions in the church

Searching marriages from FamilySearch.org indicate that Henrick Henrixsz(en) married Trijntje Lubberts on May 5, 1624 at Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands. Indexing Project No. M01225-2. Source Film No. 113358. Indexing Project No. M90102-1. Source Film No. 113364.

Various books printed between 1848 and 1928 give a brief history of the De Kype family from Ruloff De Kype born in 1510 up to the Hendrick De Kype born in 1576. This Hendrick De Kype is supposed to have taken part in the Company of Foreign Countries. It is said he also married Margaret De Marneil and came to New Amsterdam with his family in 1635.

A search of the internet for the names De Kype and De Marneil bring forward miscellaneous references to The Kip Family in America book plus others which have no relevance to us. So I do not know where these names came from.

None of the books, a list of which is provided in the bibliography, provides a source for this information. The first mention of this is contained in American Genealogy, by Jerome B. Holgate, p. 109, 1848 and The Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution, by Benson J. Lossing. Vol. II, p. 81, 1852.

All subsequent books or publications cite these two sources, with an attempt to correct some of the lineage by Edwin R. Purple in Contributions to the History of the Kip Family of New York and New Jersey, 1877.

Early records of New Amsterdam and New York often refer to Hendrick Hendricksen, the tailor or snyer or snyder. There was a second Hendrick the tailor in New Amsterdam as well, who was Hendrick Janszen Snyder. This man was the father of Catalyntje Hendricks Snyers who married Isaac Hendricksen Kip a son of Hendrick Hendricksen.

According to Fredric E. Kipp, in his book on page 19, there is a reference to the Records of Old West India Company, No. 14, LXXV fol. 90 vo, as follows.

The Minutes of the Directors of Amsterdam, Holland, record that "€œHenrick Henricksen Snijder requests for account of Henrick Jansen Snijder according to the bill of exchange, dated Aug. 15, 1635 and signed by Wouter van Twiller and Martin Gerritsen, the amount of 326 gilders, 19 stivers, 8 pennies."€ His request was referred to the Commissioners for New Netherland. Thus he was living in Amsterdam before 1636. (I have not seen this reference.) The last date they've been found in Amsterdam so far is the baptism of daughter Tryntje on June 8, 1636.

The first date they were definitely in New Netherland is April 16, 1643 when "€œHendrick Hendricksen Kyp"€ witnessed a settlement by Gertruyt Jacobs on her children -€“ New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch; Vol. II, Register of the Provincial Secretary 1642 -€“ 1647; Translated by Arnold J. F. van Laer (1974), pp. 115 -€“ 116 original document # 51c.

Then on April 19, 1643 Mr. Hendrick Hendricksz. bp. daughter Femmetje at the New Amsterdam Reformed Dutch Church. The lone witness was Jsac Hendrickszen -€“ possibly his son, who would have been 16.

On April 28, 1643, Hendrick Hendricksz Kip was granted a lot in New Amsterdam located east of the fort -- New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch; Volumes GG, HH, & II, Land Papers, Translated and Edited by Charles Gehring (1980); p. 17 original document #GG 57.

On Oct 24, 1643, he signed (as Hendrick Hendricksen Kyp) a resolution adopted by the commonality of the Manhattans – Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New-York ... ed. by E. B. O'Callaghan, vol 1, pp. 191-192.

On the Manatus map of 1639 there are two plantations shown as belonging to a tailor (snyder). One is #25 shown belonging to Hendric de Snyder and the other is #45 shown simply as Plan. van snyder. #25 is at the southern end in or near New Amsterdam; #45 is way up north in what became Harlem.

I. N. Phelps Stokes in his Iconography of Manhattan Island ... vol 2, pp. 197-198 traces land records that appear to show that #25 belonged to Hendrick Janszen, a tailor who was known to be in New Amsterdam as early as 1638.

As to #45, Stokes was not able to tell to whom it belonged (vol. 2, p. 205).

Frederic E. Kip in his History of the Kip Family in America (1928) says that the 'van Snyder' of #45 'undoubtedly refers to Hendrick Kip' (p. 23). However, later on that same page he says 'Possibly Hendrick Kip's earliest residence in Manhattan was on this plantation in New Harlem.'

However, I Howard Swain am skeptical because that would mean he was in New Netherland for four years without leaving any records – especially since he seems to have been a man of substance: He was a Great Burgher and was chosen to be one of the Nine Men, for example. After 1643 there are many records left by him.

So, it seems the best we can say is that the family arrived sometime between 1636 and 1643.

In 1647 he was chosen as one of the first Board of 'Nine Men' to act as Governing Tribunal for New Amsterdam. Apparently he was satirically called 'Hendrick Kip of the haughty lip' because he was strong and fearless. He also held office again in 1649 and 1650. He was appointed a Grand Schepen on Feb. 2, 1656, and on April 11, 1657 he was admitted to the Rights of a Great Burgher. Thus he took an important part in the government of New Amsterdam. After New Amsterdam was surrendered, he took the Oath of Allegiance to the English in October 1664.

His will (found in the Kip Family papers, Manuscript Division, New York Public Library) apparently was never officially recorded. It was drawn by notary Willem Bogardus. Since both will and accounting cite the notary, it seems likely that Bogardus, who was city treasurer 1680-85 and later postmaster of New York province, entrusted the papers to Hendrick's son Jacob, especially since Jacob, who served five terms as city schepen, aided in administering the estate. His 7800 guilder estate was a substantial one for that time period. Will dated Feb. 2, 1671; Codicil dated Aug. 4, 1680; Estate accounting March 8, 1686.

Conclusion:

Many books (from 1848 to 1928) give him an ancestry with the surname De Kype. None of these books provide a source for this information and the current maintainer of thKip/Kipp Family in America database has found no evidence to indicate it is true. It would appear his Dutch surname was Hendricksen or Henrixsz or Henrixsen and that sometime between when he arrived in New Amsterdam about 1637 and March 1643 he assumed the surname Kip. This could be described as a 'dit' name, since there were several others in New Amsterdam and New England with the surname Hendricksen and also another tailor Hendrick Jansen Snyder, sometimes referred to as Hendrick the tailor.

This conclusion is supported by a recently found reference in a 1909 book "€œHistory of the City of New York in the Seventeenth Century,"€ by Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer. In Chapter VII she talks about variations in names used in New Amsterdam and she comments "€œFor instance, the first bearer of a name now honorably known in many parts of America was a tailor whose signature for years was Hendrick Hendricksen but afterwards Hendrick Hendricksen Kip -€“ kip meaning a hen or the band that ties a bundle of dried fish."€

However, the family has used the surname Kip or Kipp since about 1643 so I do not think we are about to change.

Bibliography:

American Genealogy, Being A History of Some of the Early Settlers of North America and Their Descendants, from Their First Emigration to the Present Time, & Etc. By Jerome B. Holgate. Albany, NY: Joel Munsell. 1848.

The Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution & etc. By Benson J. Lossing. In two volumes. Vol. II. New York, NY: Harper & Brothers, Publishers. 1851.

Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York, for 1852. By D.T. Valentine. New York, NY: George P. Putnam. 1852.

Cyclopedia of American Literature & etc. By Evert A. Duyckinck and George L. Duycjinck. In two volumes. Vol. II. New York, NY: Charles Scribner. 1866.

Historical Notes of the Family of Kip of Kipsburg and Kip’s Bay, New York. Privately printed. Albany, NY: Joel Munsell. 1871.

Contributions to the History of the Kip Family of New York and New Jersey. By Edwin R. Purple. New York, NY: Privately Printed. 1877.

American Family Antiquity. By Albert Welles. Vol. II. Kip Family. New York, NY: American College for Genealogical Registry and Heraldry. 1881.

Contributions to the History of Ancient Families of New Amsterdam and New York. By Edwin R. Purple. With additions by Samuel S. Purple. New York, NY: Privately Printed. 1881.

Abstract of Title of Kip'€™s Bay Farm in the City of New York, & etc. Also Early History of the Kip Family and The Genealogy as Refers to the Title. By John J. Post. New York, NY: S. Victor Constant. 1894.

Famous Families of New York. & etc. Vol. I. By Margherita Arlina Hamm. New York, NY: G.P. Putnam'€™s Sons. 1902.

History of New Netherland or New York Under the Dutch. Vol. I. Second Edition. By E.B. O'€™Callaghan. New York, NY: D. Appleton & Co. 1855.

History of New Netherland or New York Under the Dutch. Vol. II. Second Edition. By E.B. O'€™Callaghan. New York, NY: D. Appleton & Co. 1855.

Documents Relating to the Colonial History of New-York; Procured in Holland, England and France. Vol. I. By John Romeyn Brodhead. Edited by E.B. O'€™Callaghan. Albany, NY: Weed. Parson and Co., Printers. 1856.

Transcripts of Documents in the Royal Archives of The Hague. Holland Documents: VIII -€“ XVI. 1657-1678.

Transcripts of Documents in the Queen’s State Paper Office. London Documents: I -€“ VIII. 1614-1692.

Original Narratives of Early American History. Narratives of New Netherland 1609-1664. Edited by J. Franklin Jameson. New York, NY: Charles Scribner'€™s Sons. 1909.

History of the City of New York in the Seventeenth Century, by Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer. Vol. 1, New Amsterdam. The MacMillan Co. New York. 1909.

History of the Kip Family in America. By Frederic Ellsworth Kip. Assisted by Margarita Lansing Hawley. 1928.

America Heraldica. A Compilation of Coats of Arms, Crest and Mottoes of Prominent American Families Settled in This Country Before 1800. Edited by E. De Valecourt Vermont. Brentano Brothers. New York. 1887. PP. 13 (Plate 1), 16.

An Armory of American Families of Dutch Descent, by William J Hoffman. New York Genealogical & Biographical Record. V 64. N. 1. Jan. 1933. PP. 3-7.

Name frequency

Country Frequency per million

GERMANY 55.45
UNITED STATES 28.34
DENMARK 16.75
CANADA 16.5
NETHERLANDS 13.91
SWITZERLAND 5.75
FRANCE 3.6
AUSTRIA 2.38
ARGENTINA 1.77
BELGIUM 1.15

Data

Data collected can be viewed on:

The Kip/Kipp Family of New York (New Amsterdam-America) can be found on World Connect.
In the 'Jump to a specific database' field type edwkipp8.

I also have information of the following families:

Andrew Kip and Mary: 1819 Wurttemberg, Germany. Went to Minnesota, USA.

Antonie Kipp (Kiepp) and Johanna De Man: 1763 Nassau, Dillenburg, (Duitsland). Later in Den Haag.

Antonie Kipp and 1st Elizbeth Menrath 2nd Rosine Koessler: 1720 Walburg, Bass Rhin, Alsace, France

Charles Kipp: 1866 1849 Wurtemburg, Germany

Errol Michael Kipp PA: (1733 Germany Johan Heinrick Kipp #122408 R1b) (Ray Marlin Kipp #177870 R1b Joseph 1799 grandson of John Heinrick)

Frederick Kipp Morse 1834: (1834 Baden Wurttemburg)

Ida M Kipp Hopper 1856 (Henry W. New Kersey 1801 or 1811)

Johannes Petrus Kipp 1744: I1 Jb Kipp (Cir 1720 Netherlands)

John P Kipp Molitor 1828: (1828 Ru gen Mecklenburg Vorpommern)

Spotten_Kipp: (John Kip 1787 & Polly Spotten Schaghtecoke, New York) Much of the family went to Iowa, USA.

Uline_Benson Kipp: New York State Uline 1803 - Kipp 1806

DNA

The first goal is to discover the number of founding families with the Kip/Kipp surname. This rather unusual surname is found in low numbers throughout the world. All Kip/Kipp families are welcome to participate.

A second goal is to bring together descendants of Hendrick Henricksen Kip (cir 1600 - Sept. 14, 1685), who came to New Amsterdam between 1637 and 1643. For many of the Kip/Kipp descendants of Hendrick linking back to the original 1630s ancestor may be achieved by finding common ancestry through DNA testing. Descendants of daughters of this Kip/Kipp family are welcomed to join as well and it would be appreciated if you would fill in your furthest back ancestor in your Kip/Kipp line.

A third goal has now been established in that we have matched at 37 markers with two members at 35/37 matches. As more descendants of this Kip(p) family test it will be interesting to try to separate out the three son's lines and make it easier for people to trace back in their line. The differences noted at 37 markers in the CDYa/CDYb results may have occurred at any time between Hendrick Hendricksen Kype and the present.

Haplogroups in Study

I1 is found in 1/5 of the European population and although it is most commonly found on the Scandinavian Peninsula it is also found in northwestern Europe and England. This group is thought to have spent the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Balkan States.

I2a is thought to have spent the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Balkan States and is mostly found in this area and Eastern Europe. Arriving in the mid 1700s to Pennsylvania were three Kipp families who emigrated from Rotterdam, The Netherlands (Michael Kipp, Johan Henrich Kipp and Johannes Kipp). There is a Michael Kip baptized 07 Jul 1729 -€“ Daseburg, Westfalen, Preussen (Michael Kipp emigrated 13 Oct 1749 from Rotterdam). There are a number of Johannes Kipp families in Germany in this time period (found in Baden, Hessen and Wurttemburg). More people testing in this line would assist in learning about this haplogroup line.

R1b1b2 is thought to have spent the LGM in Iberia (located in the border area of Spain and France) and is found particularly in Spain, France, the British Isles and other parts of western Europe.

We now have two distinct groupings that share haplogroup R1b1b2 but are unrelated. Certainly this haplogroup is also found in The Netherlands, present day Germany, Belgium although is predominantly a western European haplogroup.

Two members of the R1b1b2 have traced their ancestry back to Hendrick Hendricksen (Kip) the emigrant and his family of New Amsterdam, originally from the Netherlands. The other two members have not yet found a paper trail that links them to the emigrant Hendrick Hendricksen Kip (although their DNA results place them in this grouping). Family studies that become sufficiently large are often able to separate different descending lines using mutations that occur and in this case Hendrick Hendricksen Kip had three sons. Two of the members have tested to 37 markers and the two "€œfast moving"€ markers CDYa and CDYb both show differences Kit N18407 CDYa/CDYb = 36/39 and Kit 109884 CDYa/CDYb = 37/38. Kit 109884 is a descendant of Isaac Hendricksen Kip. Kit N18407 is a descendant of Isaac Kipp (b 1764). The ancestor of Isaac Kipp (b 1764) is not known at this time but Isaac Hendricksen Kip had six sons and the descendants of four of these sons have been traced to varying degrees -€“ the change could have occurred within these lines or it could be an earlier change between the three sons of Hendrick Hendricksen Kip or later down the line. More members of the family testing could help to develop familial patterns for this family.

The Family tree for Hendrick Hendricksen (Kip) is found on the webpage:

http://kipp-blake-families.ca/edwardmain.htm. Descendants of Hendrick Hendricksen (Kip) and Tryntje Lubberts of New Amsterdam - 8 Generation PDF file.

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